INTRODUCTION

A 3-phase flowchart starting with "foundations.", then "(p)reclaim.", then "reclaim.", then back into "foundations." The "(p)reclaim" phase is highlighted.
Image Description: A graphic of a 3-phase flowchart. The first phase reads "foundations." and there are floating dandelion seeds above it. The second phase reads, "(p)reclaim." with a budding dandelion below it. The third phase reads, "reclaim." with a seeding dandelion below it. There are arrows that point between these phases creating a closed-loop triangle. The "(p)reclaim." phase is highlighted with a gold circle around the text. The text and images are white on a dark brown background, and there is a solid white border around it. In the bottom right corner is The One Person Revolution logo of an owl's face.
What is the reclaim. framework?

This framework is designed to share Patañjali’s contribution to moral philosophy in the way that it is presented in the seminal text, the Yoga Sūtra.

You can download the Framework Guide here:

The reclaim. Framework

 

What are the phases of the reclaim. framework?

foundations. is the first preparatory phase and will provide baseline information aimed at contributing to (a) your understanding of yoga and it’s teachings, and (b) a deepening of your experience in the sessions offered in (p)reclaim. and reclaim.

(pre)claim. is the second preparatory phase and will address the teachings associated with antidotes to distractions that scatter the mind and impede one’s ability to begin yoga practice.

reclaim. is the ‘official’ practice phase and will address the teachings associated with yoga practice and remedies to the afflictions that reveal themselves as obstacles during practice.

(P)RECLAIM.

Prerequisite

This phase requires that you are open to operating with the commitment that you are an agent who is capable of creating change through the decisions that you make.

Those who practice other moral philosophies – especially virtue ethics – may find tension here. This is not about appealing to a higher power (that is not you) for help. It is not about the employing the law of attraction or new age manifestation techniques. This phase is very practically about you, yourself and your decision making.

 
Summary of the teachings

It is incredibly challenging to practice yoga when one’s objective, natural circumstances are unfavourable.

The major distraction that contributes to the scattering of one’s mind is illness. Additional distractions that flow from illness include apathy, doubt, negligence, sloth, non-restraint, delusion, perspectivism, failing to be grounded (flightiness/hyperactivity), and inconsistency (YS I.30).

Symptoms of these distractions include discomfort, depression, trembling of the body and disturbed inhalation and exhalation (YS I.31), all of which can be associated with poor health.

Note that Patañjali here is not only referring to illness of the physical body, but also illness of the subtle body. In yoga, every Person who has not restrained their mind is ill, and in the absence of yoga practice a Person’s illness will continue to distract them with psychic suffering, rooted in self-misunderstanding.

These distractions make it harder to practice, which re-affirms unhelpful tendencies, which make it harder to practice, which re-affirms unhelpful tendencies, etc. This is the unhelpful, whirlpool-like momentum that was described in the foundations. section.

Patañjali says that when a Person is experiencing any of these distractions or their symptoms, even just one of following seven antidotes can be employed in order to brighten mentality (YS I.31-.32).

  1. Practice (a) being friendly towards those people and things that are pleasant or amenable to us; (b) showing compassion to those who suffer and appreciating the variegated root causes of evil and suffering; (c) taking joy in those who choose well / are morally praiseworthy; and (d) responding with equanimity to those who do not choose well / are unmeritorious (YS I.33).
  2. Practice interrupting harmful, pathological breathing patterns (YS I.34).
  3. Practice resting your focus in one place (YS I.35, see also YS III.9-.10).
  4. Practice increasing the sattva (illuminative quality in Nature) in your emotional core (YS I.36).
  5. Practice letting go of attachments as strategies for self-understanding (YS I.37).
  6. Practice resting and dreaming (YS I.38)
  7. As a modified option of (3), you can practice resting your focus specifically on spiritual characters or symbols that resonate with you (YS I.39, see also YS II.11).

 

Notes
  • ‘YS’ is short for ‘Yoga Sūtra’
  • The source for all Yoga Sūtra references on this page is: Patañjali. Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra: Translation, Commentary and Introduction. Translated by S. Ranganathan. Edited by S. Ranganathan, Black Classics. Delhi: Penguin Black Classics, 2008.

MORE INFORMATION

foundations. is the first preparatory phase and will provide baseline information aimed at contributing to (a) your understanding of Yoga and it’s teachings, and (b) a deepening of your experience in the sessions offered in (p)reclaim. and reclaim.

reclaim. is the ‘official’ practice phase and will address the teachings associated with Yoga practice and remedies to the afflictions that arise as obstacles during practice. The sessions that are offered are expressions of these teachings.